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How to Take Your Fashion Modeling Career to the Next Level

If you are reading this article, you probably are a model, who wants to step up your fashion modeling career to the next level. We have the answers, but it’s not going to be sweet and easy.

We list some of the most important lifestyle changes and steps to take if you are serious about succeeding in this industry (Warning: Not for the faint hearted).

Strict Dieting

This is the first and foremost lifestyle changes to make. The top models such as those from Victoria’ Secret put complete dedication into eating healthy. They do not eat processed food at least 95% of the time, and stick to whole, real foods with low-glycemic index. They strictly follow the diet of eating heavy (carbohydrate-rich diet) for breakfast followed by subsequently lesser quantities of food throughout the day.

Typically a breakfast consists of lean meat, eggs, oatmeal, assorted vegetables; the main target is to get complex carbs and proteins early on in the day. Lunch consists of mostly vegetables and light steamed meat, most importantly carbohydrates are consumed little to none. Dinner consists of vegetables and soups, with some healthy meat. Snacks throughout the day consist of natural sugars and low salt; mostly snacks are assorted fruits (healthy sugars) and nuts (salt-free). Furthermore, a strict following of at least 8 glasses of plain water a day, and cutting out alcohol (Okay maybe you can have a drink once in a while, but no binging).

Some fashionistas such as Kat Von D and Madonna pride in a vegan diet that is free of all kinds of eggs, meats, and dairy. You can look up on their diets and how it is linked to good skin and overall health.

Strong exercise regime

If you want to be fit there are plenty of exercise regimes out there, but our favorite one for women is that of Australian supermodel Miranda Kerr, who exposes her fitness regime and dietary plans on Women’s Health and Fitness Magazine, and an excellent article by Huffington post on fitness plans for male models who should be focused on bodybuilding and toning of their muscles

Know your target market

As you intend to step into the fashion industry, you should also think about what target market best suits your look. For example in America there is an advent of plus-sized models, because they are more representative of regular, everyday women in America. As such, there is a need to think about the market that best suits the look and style you have to offer. You may have started out in your own home country, but as you decide to pursue a long term career in fashion modeling, there derives a need to think of international possibilities to advance your career.

Sign on with a model agency

If you are currently freelancing, a good way to step up your game is to sign on with a credible modeling agency that will spearhead your career. As a freelancer, you have the ability to undertake multiple contracts with various modeling agencies. You will thus be able to make a more informed choice on the modeling agency that will best work with your interests. Signing on a year’s contract or similar to that like, will mean getting more opportunities with bigger clients, and representing the agency on the international stage as well. As a model you have everything you need looked after, and you can focus your entire attention and energy into your job.

Pursue further studies in Modeling

Gaining industry knowledge and expertise in your specialized field and area will never be a disadvantage. A professional qualification in modeling will prove your capabilities as a model, and give you an edge as you progress in the modeling field.

Finally as Rihanna puts it, “work, work, work!” is the only real way to progress in the field and there is no substitute for hard work. Keep striving, getting more jobs, landing more opportunities and clients, while you have the beauty and energy to do so, and you will definitely progress far in a fashion career.

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Fatigue – Its Connection to Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia)

Fatigue in people with hypoglycemia is a direct result of the body’s continual rollercoaster ride of the ups and downs of blood sugar levels. Stop hypoglycemia and you stop fatigue.

Not everyone who experiences chronic fatigue is hypoglycemic. However, fatigue is a very big part of everyday life for hypoglycemics. Unfortunately, in most cases, sufferers eat the wrong food or take drinks containing caffeine to reduce symptoms. This only makes the problem worse.

The best way to treat hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels) and the accompanying fatigue is to change one’s diet and lifestyle. Cutting out refined sugars can be hard for someone who has become addicted to them, but in the end, you will find yourself re-energized. You will also have more enthusiasm for life than you ever dreamed possible.

Make sure you eat regular meals. Skipping a meal will not only cause your blood sugar levels to drop dramatically, but it will also deplete the energy stores in your body. Never allowing yourself to go hungry keeps you from gorging on food later in the day.

Hypoglycemia can sometimes be confused with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or Adrenal Fatigue. The symptoms of each are very similar and they can be treated in similar ways. A new dieting plan is essential to control the various problems. By neglecting changes, a hypoglycemic runs the risk of developing severe diabetes and eventually losing his eyesight. In this country, 60% of hypoglycemics may go on to become diabetics.

Even though fatigue is a very common symptom of hypoglycemia so is insomnia. Often a person suffering from hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels), has constantly racing thoughts. He or she simply cannot switch off and go to sleep. So, there they lie utterly exhausted, but unable to be rid of their anxiety. The constant tiredness and lack of sleep are part of the hypoglycemic picture.

It is important to understand that doctors believe there are different causes and various forms of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels). In addition to changing your diet, there are also natural dietary supplements that can be helpful, such as liquorice root. There are natural treatments to help ease the anxiety that results in insomnia, so that you will rest easier.

A hypoglycemic should have a diet that is high in fiber and rich in complex carbohydrates and protein. This will help slow the absorption of sugar into the blood.

Avoid white, processed flours and instead consume whole-wheat products. Refined carbohydrates like pastries and sugars should be avoided as well. Caffeine, alcohol,and stimulants of any kind should be eliminated from your diet. Mineral and Vitamin supplements have been found to be very important in getting you back on the road to health.

Hypoglycemia doesn’t have to take over your life. At present you may think that you will have to live with the symptoms for the rest of your life.

But with improvements to your lifestyle, you will become healthier and more energetic once again. With the right information in your hands, you can go on to lead a very productive life.

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Liposuction – Getting the Most Out of Your Plastic Surgery

If you suffer from awkward pouches of flabbage or a spare tire that just won’t quite, liposuction may be the answer. Liposuction is a plastic surgery operation that removes subcutaneous fat from targeted areas, leaving you a new, skinny you.

Are You A Good Candidate For Liposuction?

The first step to getting rid of the flab is to decide if you are a good candidate. Fat removal surgery isn’t just a quick and easy diet plan. This operation works on the areas that dieting and exercise just won’t get rid of.

Many of us try our best dieting and working out, only to find that little bits of our previous chubby selves remain here and there. No matter how you work it, you still end up with these leftovers. If this sounds like you, you are the perfect candidate for liposuction.

Some folks find that they have flab in weird areas like their necks, arms, ankles, calves and thighs. This gives the body an awkward shape all over, and it is unsightly. The biggest target area for liposuction is the belly. Fat accumulates easily around the abdomen as you get older, but doesn’t come off so easily. Fat removal surgery is the perfect way to contour your body.

The Key to Making Your Surgery Effective

You go in, get some anesthesia, the doctor pokes around, and finally…. You’re a new you! Now, life gets back to normal. Actually, there are lots of cases where people put the weight back on, and end up going back repeatedly. This costs money and is a major headache. Why not get the most out of your liposuction the first time?

It could take up to several months to recovery fully. Your doctor will give you special garments to wear, which will help the healing process. If these garments aren’t fitted just right, you may have trouble with the incisions healing correctly, and it will mean more doctor visits.

For the first few days, there will be drainage tubes. During recovery, the pain isn’t bad, but there is often some bruising and swelling which can be uncomfortable. After a couple of weeks, the incision scars harden. All of this is natural, so be patient until your body gets back into shape.

Your plastic surgeon will advise you on what to do, and the key is to follow their advice. Get your body healing right, and your liposuction will be a success.

Another important thing is to eat well and get exercise. At first, you will have to take it easy, and your doctor may ask you to not move around much. But, you’ll want to transition into a healthy lifestyle so that you can take care of your new body. Liposuction doesn’t mean that you can eat anything you want now! Not unless you want to flab to make a comeback.

Liposuction isn’t a quick and easy diet plan, but it is a wonderful way to contour your body. Plastic surgery offers you a great way to get the body you want. Let liposuction fight the flab and make you proud of your body again.

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Fat Loss For Busy People – The Warrior Diet

The Warrior Diet: fatloss for busy people.

In today`s society, most of us lead extraordinarily busy and hectic lives, so the idea of trying to remember what to eat or not eat at exactly what time is a prospect that often turns off people to dieting. I am definitely in the same boat, with classes at odd times during the school year, and a full and part time job on my breaks so I hate having to worry about what my next meal is going to be.

Enter the Warrior diet!

The basic premise of this diet is that you only eat one big meal per day and nothing else, except maybe a piece of fruit in the morning. This is an incredibly flexible diet that almost anyone can fit into their schedule. Most people end up eating their large meal at either lunch or dinner, but you can eat whenever you want to. I love eating like this during especially busy days since I actually feel more energetic during the day without food in my stomach, and then I`m ready for a big meal

Don`t worry about your metabolism slowing down.

I think many people tend to get caught up in the idea of eating multiple meals per day as “healthy”. This is a mainstream media and bodybuilding myth perpetuated by supplement companies who want nothing more than you eating protein shakes and popping pills six times a day. Now I`m not saying that eating 6 meals per day is not effective, I just think most people tend to eat too much at these smaller meals, and it requires a lot of discipline and planning to be effective. If anything, your body will go into overdrive to maintain your lean body mass, while living off of your fat stores during the period you aren’t eating. You lose more fat, your body works better: a win-win situation!

Elite military units do it: You can too

A good example is the US Army Ranger School. These guys are forced to go days at a time eating little to nothing, then come back and essentially “make up” their calorie deficit. Now I admit this isn’t the greatest example since they actually lose muscle mass during their training, but that is because they aren’t doing any heavy resistance training (i.e. weights), and they are in an extreme survival scenario eating foods with low protein and vitamin content. You and I don`t have that problem, so don`t worry about it.

Why eating all your calories in one meal is actually healthy

Think about it. Our caveman ancestors almost certainly didn t have access to food 24/7, eating snacks every couple of hours “To keep their metabolism up”. I really don`t think it`s healthy to have food constantly in your stomach. If your gut, liver and stomach are constantly working to process food, when are they going to rest? It seems very natural to have one big meal after a period of fasting. Now I wouldn t recommend eating like this every single day, but maybe 3-5 times a week is definitely doable.

A caveat before you try this

Be careful not to overeat while on the Warrior diet. Eating all your calories in one meal can be a lot of fun and you can be a little less strict on the types of foods you eat. However, I would definitely try to fill up on veggies and lean meats as the base of the meal first, and then move on to starches or high carb foods like bread or potatoes. This will help you keep calories in check and insure you get an adequate amount of protein.

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Book Review – Why Can’t I Lose Weight? The Real Reasons Diets Fail And What To Do About It

Every so often, I will read a book that captures my attention so completely that I hate to put it down. Then I go back to it repeatedly, long after I have finished the review. Jackie Bushell’s 116-page ebook, Why Can’t I Lose Weight? (2006 DietPlateau.com) is such a book.

There are truckloads of diet books available that claim to have the “secrets” of weight loss, or the diet supplement or plan that is the long awaited magic bullet. Many are gimmicks, some are completely misleading, and others only touch on the problems but offer no real solutions. Not the case with Why Can’t I Lose Weight.

I found this ebook to be filled with practical, medically-based answers to many of my questions about weight loss, plateaus, healthy fat loss, metabolism and that all important question of why the weight so often comes back no matter how “good” I am on my diet du jour.

Based on the long-term research and study from an impressive list of health and medical reference sources, Bushell writes about the changing theories of diet and exercise, addresses diet hype, fads, trends and introduces solid information based in biochemistry and documented scientific facts. Her goal is to start with facts and toss out misleading and misinterpreted data, along with outdated beliefs. In her book, she introduces her readers to current, relevant and proven facts about low calorie, low fat, low carb, and low glycemic diets. This book, written in an easy to read manner, helps clear the fog of myths and unsupported claims and shine a logical, detailed light on diet and healthy weight loss facts.

This straightforward and honest statement from her conclusion sums up the philosophy, tone and mission of her book: “Getting your body fit for weight loss is about making your body healthy in general, and that takes time and patience. Getting healthy is not about quick fixes, and nor is successful weight loss…. Making sure you lose the right kind of weight and in the right way is key to ensuring that when the weight comes off, it stays off.”

There are 15 chapters and three appendices that include topics and detailed “secrets” about:

  • Famine syndrome and the set point
  • The blood sugar/insulin connection
  • Metabolic rate
  • Stress
  • Food allergies/sensitivities
  • Candida/yeast overgrowth
  • Fluid retention
  • Malnutrition
  • Toxic overload
  • Genetic inheritance
  • Exercise
  • Hormonal imbalance
  • Prescription medicines
  • Compulsive eating and cravings
  • Diet “politics” and how overweight perceptions can cause overlooked medical issues
  • Thermogenic & fat burning supplements
  • A Personal Action Plan for Weight Loss Success

Author Jackie Bushell is dedicated to the message in her book. As she stated at the close, “So what I hope to have achieved with this book is to bring together all of the most important knowledge and new ideas related specifically to weight loss problems, screening out the many ideas that are unsupported by science.” Personally, I think she has accomplished this.

As I read her ebook, I was struck at the dedication and depth of research she put into the project. There is no doubt that she is very knowledgeable and passionate about this subject, and her list of resources backs up her work. Why Can’t I Lose Weight? contains a lot of common sense and medically supported nutritional information that is applicable to a great many frustrated dieters, just like myself. I experienced many “ah-ha!” moments while reading through the pages.

I recommend this book for anyone who has questions about healthy weight loss, curiosity about diet hype and trends, interest in nutritional weight loss, or anyone wanting to know the truth about the “low carb” diet phenomenon. But I especially recommend this book to anyone who suspects there could be an underlying health issue causing them to be resistant to weight loss. Why Can’t I Lose Weight? could answer many of your questions. It sure did for me.

Why Can’t I Lose Weight? is a downloadable PDF ebook, available at GoodDietGoodHealth.com.

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The Endomorph – Hard Losers and Their Training and Nutrition Strategy

Most people who are working hard but still struggling to lose body fat are endomorphs. An endomorph is someone with a slow metabolism who is genetically prone to store fat easily. Endomorphs are usually, but not always, large framed with medium to large joints.

Endomorphs sometimes have varying degrees of carbohydrate sensitivity and insulin resistance, so high carbohydrate diets are usually not effective for body fat control. Processed and refined carbohydrates that contain white sugar and white flour are especially detrimental and tend to convert to body fat more rapidly in endomorphs. Low to moderate carbohydrate diets with higher protein usually work best for endomorphs.

While some genetically gifted mesomorphs and ectomorphs can eat whatever they want and never gain any fat, the endomorph must eat clean and healthy almost all the time. This requires the development of high levels of nutritional discipline. Endomorphs are the types who will tend to gain body fat very quickly if they eat too much or if they eat the wrong types of foods.

Endomorphs cannot “cheat” frequently and get away with it. Their metabolisms are extremely unforgiving. One or two cheat meals per week seem to be the limit. Poor daily nutrition habits or frequent cheat days always set them back.

Endomorphs generally have a very difficult time losing fat with diet alone. Even a nearly perfect diet sometimes won’t work by itself because the endomorph needs the boost in metabolism that exercise provides.

A larger quantity of cardio is almost always necessary for the endomorph to lose body fat. Someone with a low endomorph component may stay lean with little or no cardio at all. Extreme endomorphs usually need cardio every day before the body fat begins to come off.

Occasionally, an extreme endomorph (7 on the endomorph scale), will have a difficult time losing fat even while on a well-constructed training and nutrition program. Extreme endomorphs sometimes need to restrict carbohydrates drastically (under 100 g./day for women, under 175 g./day for men) before any substantial fat loss occurs. They may also need to use a carbohydrate cycling approach that rotates high carbohydrate days with low carbohydrate days in order to stimulate their sluggish metabolisms and prevent going into starvation mode. Santa Claus is the archetypical endomorph.

Endomorph characteristics

Naturally high levels of body fat (often overweight) Usually large boned, large joints, large frame (but not always) Short, tapering arms and legs Smooth, round body contours (round or pear shaped body) Wide waist and hips Waist dominates over chest Tendency to always store excess calories as fat (can’t get away with overeating) Keeping fat off after it is lost is a challenge Tendency to be sluggish, slow moving and lacking energy Slow thyroid or other hormone imbalance (sometimes) Fairly good strength levels Sensitive to carbohydrates (carbs are easily stored as fat) Responds better to diets with higher protein and low (or moderate) carbs Naturally slow metabolic rate/low set point (fewer calories burned at rest) Falls asleep easily and sleeps deeply A lot of cardio is necessary to lose weight and body fat Extremely difficult to lose weight (requires great effort) Bouts of fatigue and tiredness Often describe themselves as having a “slow metabolism” Tendency to gain fat easily as soon as exercise is stopped Tendency to lose fat slowly, even on a “clean,” low fat, low calorie diet. Often overweight, even though they don’t eat very much Respond best to frequent, even daily, training

Endomorph training and nutrition strategy

When it comes to fat loss, a well-planned, strategic approach to nutrition and training is more important for the endomorph than for any other body type. The endomorph strategy focuses on high levels of activity and extreme levels of discipline and consistency in nutritional habits. Most endomorphs also need some degree of carbohydrate restriction with higher protein levels to compensate.

High protein, medium to low carbs

High protein, low to moderate carb diets work best for the endomorph. Endomorphs usually have varying degrees of carbohydrate sensitivity and insulin resistance. Therefore, high carbohydrate, low fat diets are usually not effective. Sugar is a major no-no: Processed and refined carbohydrates that contain white sugar and white flour tend to convert to body fat very rapidly in endomorphs because of the way they affect the hormone insulin.

Exercise is an absolute MUST

Endomorphs generally have a very difficult time losing fat with diet alone. Even a close-to-perfect diet often doesn’t work by itself because the endomorph needs the boost in metabolism that comes from exercise. The endomorph must do everything in his or her power to stimulate their metabolism and this means combining good nutrition with weight training and aerobic training. To diet without exercising means certain failure for the endomorph.

Large amounts of cardio

Someone with a low endomorph component may stay lean with little or no cardio at all. Endomorphs need a larger quantity of cardio to lose body fat. Most endomorphs will lose fat with surprising ease by doing some type of cardio at least 4 – 5 times per week. Extreme endomorphs usually need cardio every day (seven days per week). All endomorphs will tend to gain the fat back if they stop doing cardio completely. Often, they successfully lose weight, but then put it back on if they haven’t made the commitment to continue exercising for life.

Get more activity in general

Endomorphs usually (but not always) have a tendency towards relaxing as opposed to staying constantly in motion. Their natural inclination is usually to kick back in the easy chair, while their ectomorphic or mesomorphic counterpart might “relax” with a nice 40mile bike ride.

The best strategy for the endomorph is to get active and stay active! You have to get moving! Take up some sports or recreational activities in addition to your regular workouts in the gym. If you’re an endomorph you should get some type of activity almost every day.

Make a lifelong commitment to fitness

Endomorphs must commit to a lifelong exercise program and avoid quick fixes or any short-term approach to fitness. After reaching the long term ultimate body fat and body weight goal, the endomorph needs to commit to at least three days a week of exercise -for life – to keep the fat off. This should be done for health reasons anyway, but for the endomorph, exercise is essential to maintain a desirable body fat ratio. Once you begin, you must keep going or you will lose your momentum. Every time you stop working out, you can be sure the body fat will slowly start to creep back on. Long “vacations” from physical activity are not a good idea. Get your momentum going and keep it going.

Train hard

The basic endomorph disposition is towards taking it easy and relaxing. If you are an endomorph, you must fight this urge and train with high intensity. You have to push yourself constantly. Not only must you train almost every day, you must push yourself to train harder every day and repeatedly beat your own personal best. The best advice for the endomorph that I’ve ever heard came from a Zen master; Roshi Philip Kapleau. He said,

“Don’t relax your efforts, otherwise it will take you a long time to achieve what you are after.”

Increase your training frequency

This is important – the endomorph must stay in motion to keep their metabolic engine revving. Staying still for too long is the death of the endomorph. The boost in resting metabolism from training doesn’t last long. For someone with a naturally slow metabolism, the only way to keep it elevated is with a high frequency of training.

Increase your training duration

Losing fat all boils down to burning calories. You must burn more calories than you consume each day. The most obvious way to burn more calories is to do your cardio for a longer duration. 20 minutes is the recommended starting point for effective fat burning, but for the endomorph, this is seldom enough. 20 minutes is a maintenance workout for endomorphs. For maximum fat loss I recommend 30-45 minutes of continuous aerobic activity and in some instances it may be necessary to go as long as 60 minutes until a goal is achieved. Go back to the 20-minute workouts for maintenance only after you reach your goal.

Avoid over-sleeping.

Endomorphs should avoid excessive sleep. They should be early risers. The chances are good that if you’re an endomorph, you are not an early riser and you often have the urge to hit snooze and go back to sleep. Resist this urge. Getting up early for morning cardio is one of the best strategies for the endomorph.

Watch Less TV

Any pastimes or hobbies that glue your rear end to a couch are not the preferred option for an endomorph, especially if you also spend 40 hours or more behind a desk each week. This means you should replace as much TV watching as possible with physical recreation or exercise (unless your workout machine is parked in front of the TV and you’re on it).

Use metabolism-stimulating exercise

Weight training exercises that utilize large muscle groups like the back and legs are extremely effective for stimulating the metabolism and for stimulating the hormones that increase fat burning. High rep compound leg exercises (squats, lunges, leg presses, etc) are particularly effective for this purpose. Toning classes, yoga, pilates and similar activities have some fantastic benefits, but for the endomorph, this type of activity is NOT the ideal way to lower body fat. Participate in these activities as a supplement to your regular weights and cardio, but not by themselves.

Always be on the lookout for something to motivate and inspire you.

Endomorphs sometimes lack motivation, especially in the beginning. The solution is to be on the constant lookout for anything and everything to motivate and inspire you. Read biographies. Watch the Olympics, get a training partner, read motivational books, hire a trainer or personal coach, re-write your goals every single day, or enter a before and after fitness contest. Stay pumped up and fired up!

Restrict carbohydrates, but never remove them completely

The endomorph nutrition strategy leans towards higher protein (and slightly higher fat) diet with more moderate carbohydrates (Similar to a “Zone” diet). This is necessary because most endomorphs tend to be carbohydrate sensitive. People with normal carbohydrate metabolisms can consume up to 50-60% of their total calories from carbohydrates and stay lean, while endomorphs will tend to get fat eating this many carbohydrates.

Keep cheat meals to only once per week

Endomorphs have very unforgiving metabolisms. They cannot “cheat” frequently and get away with it. One or two cheat meals per week seem to be the limit. Poor daily habits or frequent cheat days always seem to set them back. Cheat days should be reserved for special occasions or as well-deserved rewards for a week of great training and nutrition.

Be consistent and persistent

The endomorph loses body fat more slowly than ectomorphs or mesomorphs. Therefore, endomorphs must be very consistent and diligent in eating and exercise habits 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a year. Going on and off diet and exercise programs will never work for the endomorph. Endomorphs will lose body fat just like everyone else, but it almost always takes a little longer. The results will come, but not without time and effort. Patience is a virtue all endomorphs must cultivate.

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Eating Disorders: The Internalization of the Thin Body Ideal

Research over the last two decades has indicated that the incidence of eating disorders appears to be increasing. Health care professionals have reported what some consider to be epidemic rates of these disorders in recent years, particularly among adolescents. One extreme (but possibly inflated) estimate is that 20% of the total female population between the ages of 12 and 30 suffer from a major eating disorder; this may represent a 10% increase from three decades ago.

Although most researchers concur that the number of new cases of eating disorders is increasing, there is less agreement about the factors that may be promoting this increase. Sociocultural factors are thought to play a central etiological role, and have received the most research attention in the last decade. Specifically, many theorists strongly believe that our culture’s ultraslender ideal-body image (or thin-ideal) portrayed in the media has been a critical contributor. The thin-ideal woman is actually a caricature; she is well below the average weight of typical women in our culture, and is portrayed as optimally successful, desirable, and happy. Sociocultural theorists and researchers also argue that the thin-ideal depicted in the media has become significantly thinner over the last several decades and, therefore, the discrepancy between the thin-ideal (i.e., 5’10”, 110lbs) and the average woman (i.e., 5’4″, 142lbs) has increased. This, combined with the intense focus on dieting in our culture, has reportedly helped promote the current epidemic rates of eating disorders.

According to the sociocultural model of eating disorders, young girls in our society quickly learn that thinness elicits many forms of social reinforcement, achievement, and rewards, whereas obesity is associated with various social punishments such as social isolation. Therefore, repeated exposure to the successful thin-ideal portrayed by the media leads some girls and women to overinternalize the stereotype. That is, women’s perception of the typically dramatic discrepancy between their body shape and size, relative to the cultural ideal, is thought to produce heightened body dissatisfaction and depressed moods, and prompts them to set unrealistic body-dimension goals for themselves. It is argued that as young girls are repeatedly exposed to thin-ideal images they will begin to internalize this thin-ideal. Theorists argue that with the thin-ideal becoming even thinner in recent years, many young women are finding it increasingly impossible to achieve an ultraslim body form. They begin to take more drastic measures to control their body weight (i.e., restricting, purging, excessive exercise) and develop negative feelings about themselves and their body. A vicious cycle is started, because growing body dissatisfaction is thought to lead to increased dieting and use of extreme measures to lose weight in some women.

Sociocultural researchers have compiled a plenitude of indirect evidence linking the decreasing size of the thin-ideal in the media and intense focus on dieting in our culture to increased rates of eating disorders. However, only a few research investigations have attempted to directly examine whether a relationship exists between the thin-ideal image portrayed in the media, and women’s satisfaction with their own bodies. Given the prevalence of eating disorders, more empirical evidence is needed to determine whether there is a relationship between the thin-ideal image depicted in the media, and women’s dissatisfaction with their bodies. To help further this area of research, I recently completed a study that experimentally examined the effects of exposure to the thin-ideal on women’s affect, self-esteem, body satisfaction, and level of internalization of the thin body image. My research also assessed how the thin-ideal image differentially impacted women with a diagnosed eating disorder. College women (N= 145) were randomly exposed to photographs from three popular women’s magazines (Cosmopolitan, Vogue, and Glamour) containing either thin-ideal images or neutral images (non-models). The subjects in each group viewed 40 images and were asked to answer a corresponding question on the Media Response Questionnaire. This questionnaire was developed specifically for this research to help maximize experimental conditions versus control effects and ensure that subjects adequately attended to all important features of the media materials for a set period of time. Subjects then completed several measures which included: subscales of the Eating Disorder Inventory, Second Edition (EDI-2), Profile of Mood States (POMS), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE), and the Sociocultural Attitudes Toward Appearance Questionnaire (SATAQ).

The results of this study indicated that brief exposure (30 minutes) to thin images produced heightened levels of body dissatisfaction among women. The findings also indicated that after being exposed to the thin-ideal images, women in the experimental group reported increased negative mood states (i.e. depression, anger, anxiety, fatigue and confusion) compared to women who viewed neutral images. The findings suggest that women had lower scores on the self-esteem measure after exposure to thin images. It was also found that women in the clinical group exhibited lower self-esteem scores than women with eating disorders in the control condition. It was expected that exposure to the thin body image would result in higher levels of internalization of the thin-ideal; however, the results indicated that women exposed to these images had significantly lower levels of internalization compared to women in the neutral condition. One explanation for this finding is that women in the experimental group were reluctant to endorse that they admired this thin-ideal body image given the majority felt dissatisfied with their bodies, exhibited negative mood states, and felt less self-worth after exposure to the images. Hence, women may be reluctant to willingly acknowledge wanting to aspire to look like a thin-ideal when it creates personal distress. One finding of particular interest was that women with eating disorders exhibited significantly more body dissatisfaction and depression after exposure to the thin-ideal relative to all other subgroups of women. This finding suggests that women with eating disorders experience pronounced changes in affect and self-approval compared with other women when viewing images of the thin-ideal.

It should not be surprising that media images have an influence upon their audience. However, the findings of this research suggest that the photographic representation of women in mass circulation fashion magazines can have a powerful influence on women’s self-appraisals. The broader social implications of this research become apparent when one considers the current debate over the appropriateness of ultrathin fashion models (e.g., Kate Moss). It is clear that these images send a dangerous message. Exposure to the media-portrayed thin-ideal was shown to be related to body dissatisfaction, negative affect, and low self-esteem and suggests that women may directly model disordered eating behavior presented in the media (e.g., fasting or purging). Additionally, the focus on dieting in the media may promote dietary restraint, which appears to increase the risks for binge eating.

Media presentation of “idealized” women cannot be the only factor responsible for women’s negative self-appraisals. However, this effect is substantial enough to suggest that media presentation of idealized women’s bodies may have practical relevance. In terms of a clinical application, it might be critical to advise female anorexics and bulimics to avoid publications or television programs that portray women as thin-ideal images. Second, women’s responsiveness to such images might be addressed through cognitive-behavioral therapy. Third, school-based prevention efforts could be aimed at reducing the internalization of the thin-ideal stereotype, as well as promoting body satisfaction. These programs should also emphasize the incongruence between biology and the thin-ideal body image. Negative psychological and physiological risks associated with the pursuit of this body type need to be underscored.

Today’s women can be helped by using media to their advantage, encouraging media representatives to adopt role models reflecting a broader spectrum of beauty than that which has traditionally been portrayed. Several campaigns (Special K, Just My Size) suggest that some media representatives are trying to portray more realistic images.

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The Ideal Diet for Hypothyroidism

If you have hypothyroidism is very important to know that the type of diet you follow can help you reduce your symptoms, and at the same time help you control your weight. Weight gain goes hand in hand with hypothyroidism and to some people it gets rather difficult to lose weight with this condition.

There are key nutrients and foods that a diet for hypothyroid should include. On the other hand, there are certain foods that should be avoided.

What Your Diet Should Have

A healthy diet for someone with hypothyroidism would include whole grains, natural foods, plenty of fruits and vegetables and a good supply of seafood and other lean protein. You should cut back on fatty meats. A multivitamin is probably a good idea if you don’t already take one.

An Important Mineral

Selenium may be the most important nutrient in a diet for hypothyroid.

Why?

This trace mineral is an antioxidant and is essential for converting the thyroid hormone your body produces, T4, into its active form, T3. Brazil nuts are an incredibly good source of selenium, but you can also get it from some lean meats.

Fiber is Key to Control Your Weight

Another tactic that will be very helpful for you if you’re trying to lose weight is eating more fiber. Fiber makes you feel full and can help you lose weight, in addition to being helpful for constipation, another side effect of hypothyroidism.

You can ingest your fiber in pill form or through one of those over-the-counter fiber concoctions, but it is so much better if you get your fiber from actual foods, like beans, rice and other grains, whole wheat and oatmeal.

Strive for whole grains, also known as complex carbohydrates, over refined grains (things made with white flour or sugar). They’re better for you, help maintain your blood sugar stable and will make you feel fuller.

Alcohol should also be avoided because it can cause blood sugar fluctuations.

A Diet With More Meals

Ideally, a diet for low thyroid function will include small meals spread out through the day rather than three big meals. If you eat five or six small meals it will help balance the slow metabolism that is part of hypothyroidism. Just remember, keep these meals around 300 calories each, and include exercise if you want to lose weight, too.

Some doctors recommend the Zone diet to those with hypothyroid. The why behind the system is somewhat complicated, but it has to do with balancing out your insulin reaction to food, limiting the spikes and crashes you probably feel right now. Carbs are a big part of this diet, particularly those refined grains we were just talking about.

The diet calls for drinking lots of water (a good idea for anyone), eating more fruit and vegetables and less pasta, bread and starches, and a small amount of lean protein through the day. Most of your carbs should come from fruit and vegetables, with other starches used sparingly. You also should not go more than five hours between meals.

Red Light Foods

As we were saying before, your diet should not include certain foods. Some vegetables, fruits and grains can depress the function of your thyroid gland. To learn about these foods visit diet for hypothyroid.

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Build Muscle Faster With Endomorph Body Type Sport Fitness Secrets

If you a stocky, smooth muscled and round in shape; if you are carrying most of your fat in your face (especially your neck and cheeks) around your waist, hips and thighs; you are the classic endomorph. When you are trim and fit, you’re easily mistaken for a mesomorph body type.

The tell-tale fat deposit under the chin and the cheeks begin to show once you slack off from working out and dieting. Since this body type is very efficient at storing calories, they are far less efficient at losing fat. Their metabolic rate is naturally slower than others and makes it that much harder to see results when working out or dieting.

The classic endomorph will have a naturally high degree of body fat, around the midsection. They usually take the shape or pattern of a pear. Overweight endomorphs will have a hard time controlling their weight; (think of Oprah Winfrey or John Goodman). There is a soft smooth look to endomorphs that

The proliferation of fast food restaurants and other convenience foods, make healthy living difficult for you and due to your natural tendency to skip meals when worried or busy, you’re likely to gain weight from eating less!

Classic endomorphs are not always big fans of working out even though they might like to watch sports or play them in a video game. Because this body type is less likely to participate in sports activities, it is essential that they get daily exercise. Unlike the mesomorph or ectomorph who can get away with slacking off for a few days, endomorphs will easily find their bodies slowing down and succumbing to tiredness or fatigue after a few days off.

I belabor this point because although endomorphs tend to be very physically attractive at their optimal bodyweight, they will look and feel drastically different when they let their fat percentage go past 25-30 percent.

The Endomorph Workout

If you hate cardio, sign up right now for a burial plot. High intensity short duration cardio exercise will save your life. Perform cardio routines like jump rope, rebound, boxing, elliptical machine or cycling. Avoid swimming and high impact aerobics. You will love swimming because it’s easy on your body and good for the heart but it will do little to help you lose fat. You’ll hate high impact aerobics if you’re already out of shape. It will leave you feeling tired initially and that alone can discourage most out of shape endomorphs.

Keep the cardio down to 20-30 minutes. The real secret to changing your metabolism will be capitalizing on your asset. Endomorphs build muscle as easily as mesomorphs do.

Muscle Building Workout

The fact is, that many endomorphs try dieting first and lose muscle mass instead of fat. The weight goes down but the metabolism gets slower. Once they switch their diet back to the old way, the fat stores get even bigger and the muscles are still soft. If you are getting back into shape, I recommend compound exercises for at least the first six weeks. The three best compound exercises for you overall body development as an endomorph are squats, deadlifts and chest press. Work with these three exercises for high reps 10-12 and low sets (1-3) to stimulate your muscles for strength training. You must choose a weight that allows you to finish your sets with proper form yet challenge you to progressively increase the weight through the six week training.

Stick to a protein rich lower carb diet that completely removes processed flour, sugar and hydrogenated fats and oils. Take your carbs from fruits and vegetables and omit pasta or other processed starches for now. You goal is to feed your muscles for six weeks and get them burning fat for you 24/7.

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Tapering for a Judo Competition

You must taper for a judo competition if you want to perform to the best of your ability. There are a few keys aspects to tapering, these include:

– choosing a competition

– dieting

– judo training

– physical training

– mental preparation

Choosing a competition

Choosing a competition is crucial if you want to perform to the best of your ability. The competition you choose should be one that you really want to do well in and one that you spend every waking moment thinking about. It is a good idea to choose a competition that is going to be pretty tough. There is no point choosing a tournament that will be easy to win or too hard to win. I believe that the competition you taper for must be one that you must dedicate all of your training in order to win. This way you will train hard leading right up until fight day.

Dieting

Make sure that you diet for fight day. When you choose a competition you now know what day weigh in is. Therefore it is crucial that you diet. I have seen so many athletes running weight off and crash dieting to make weight. I ask the same question every time, “didn’t you know you had a competition on?”

Please make sure you watch what you are eating and make weight comfortably.

Training

Your training should also taper towards fight day. There is no point doing one hour of randori one day before the competition day. When the competition is far away you should be doing a lot of randori, but at a lower intensity. Then as the competition gets closer you should shorten the duration and increase the intensity at which you are training.

Physical preparation

Your physical preparation is another very important aspect of your tapering preparation. As a competition gets closer you should be increasing your intensity, shortening the duration and lengthening the rest periods between sets. I usually do a three repetition max on bench press and dead lifts about a week out from competition. I find lifting heavy weights just before a competition gives me a lot of confidence coming in to fight day.

Mental preparation:

Preparing mentally is a huge aspect of tapering. You must be mentally prepared to fight to the hardest and best of your ability level. You should constantly be thinking about the competition and thinking about what you are going to attack with etc. This way when it comes to fight day it feels like you have been there before.

Knowing exactly what to do before every competition takes years of trial and error. When it comes to judo there is always something new to learn.

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